Adventure Education (with Til Luchau & Whitney Lowe)

Summary: What’s the reality of combining learning with travel? Whitney talks with Til about his recent  educational retreat in Thailand, his teaching trip to Taiwan, and his upcoming professional continuing education retreats in Puerto Rico, on the Camino de Santiago in Spain, and around the USA. 

 

Whitney Lowe:

Welcome to The Thinking Practitioner Podcast, where we are supported by Handspring Publishing. Their catalog has emerged as one of the leading collections of professional level books written, especially for body workers, movement teachers, and all professionals who use movement or touch to help patients achieve wellness.

Til Luchau:

Handspring has joined with Jessica Kingsley Publishers, Integrative Health, Singing Dragon Imprint. So head on over to their website at handspringpublishing.com to check their list of titles, including my Advanced Myofascial Techniques books, and be sure to use the code TTP at checkout for a discount. Thanks, Handspring. You’ve been a great source of guests for this podcast too. Amazing author shelf. Look forward to more of those. We are also sponsored today by the Back Jam, which is 16 teachers, four Mondays in May, one body part, the back. I am teaching an hour of some fun new things I’m playing with with the back on May 1st. Whitney, when is your day, when you teach?

Whitney Lowe:

My day is actually, yeah, the next week on May 8.

Til Luchau:

Okay. So May 1st is when it leads off, and then every Monday in May 2023, if you’re listening to this in the future, you can hear from a different set of teachers sharing their ideas on the back. It’s available later by recording. Teachers include Ruth Werner, Tom Myers, Alison Denny, Benny Vaughn, Sue Hitsman, Paul Kelly, Aubrey Gallan, Allison, what’s her last name, Whitney?

Whitney Lowe:

Kavanaugh.

Til Luchau:

Kavanaugh. Thank you. And many more. All hosted by Diane Matkowski, who is getting so good at this stuff. I can’t believe it. Go directly to bitly/thinkingback for our podcast unique link to take you right there if you want, or you can save 50 bucks when you bundle it with my Spine Principles course, which starts right about the same time. It is a great compliment to all the views you’re getting in the Back Jam. We go really deep into the advanced myofascial techniques work in the Spine’s Principles course, again available later by recording. Save 50 bucks when you register for both at Spine Principles Online. Sorry, that’s Bitly slash spine principles online, and we’ll put those links in the show notes.

Whitney Lowe:

All right.

Til Luchau:

I always like getting done with those. I don’t know about you. We need those. Those are great. I love the sponsors and I always feel good when I’m done reading that.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah.

Til Luchau:

How are you doing, Whitney?

Whitney Lowe:

I’m doing very well. Good to see you again. It’s been quite a while. You’ve been off for a little bit here and off gallivanting around the globe.

Til Luchau:

Gallivanting, putting in some frequent flyer miles. Thanks for holding down the fort. You had some really interesting conversations while I was away.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah, and we’re still here and it’s good to have you back again. Tell us today, I wanted to say welcome back and talk a little bit about your trips, some of the things that you saw, explored, encountered, and did, and see how that might be relevant for some of the people looking into various types of explorations with their learning as well.

Til Luchau:

All right. So stories from my travels and then how it can be relevant. Do you want me to show all 180 slides from my film…?

Whitney Lowe:

Just like the family slideshow, let’s do that. Let’s go through all the slides.

Til Luchau:

I’m tempted, there’s so many beautiful things to show, but I’m not going to do that. Although if we have time, I might show you one little twenty-second video and talk through the audio listeners while we do that, because now we have these YouTube videos we’re releasing, so you can go there and see it.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah. And for people who didn’t know, we are now recording our presentations most weeks on YouTube, so you can see those as well as we’re chatting here.

Til Luchau:

Yeah.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah.

Til Luchau:

But I’m pleased that you asked. Thank you. It was a phenomenal trip and I think it does maybe open up some possibilities in terms that could be applied in all kinds of situations for learning and travel, et cetera.

Whitney Lowe:

So where did you go? I mean, tell us, where was this?

Til Luchau:

First stop was Thailand, where we went to a floating raft house surrounded by National Park up in the mountains in Thailand. And this raft house has a big yoga sala, big yoga room. Again, it’s all on pontoons and all of the rooms are floating. Maybe it’s a good time just for me to show that video, get the picture of the place.

Whitney Lowe:

Get the gist of it all. Yeah.

Til Luchau:

Because the place was so much a part of the experience. I’ll tell you about the amazing learning experience too. Let me get this fired up here for you. But the place itself, it took us half an hour by boat to get there, and once you’re there, we’re just there. It’s totally offline, total digital detox and out on this lake. So here’s the boat ride out and half an hour on the boat to these floating raft houses where our individual bungalows were roped together and floating on a lagoon in this huge lake. And we had this whole place to ourself for 10 days of just body work instruction, movement instruction, and then every afternoon we practiced what we learned.

So it was an amazing learning format too, where the mornings we were busy and learning, and the afternoon’s very spacious, but lots of sessions being traded, lots of supervision. Some people brought their partners and spouses in for some targeted work, and we’d help strategize and apply the work of the day. And then we had three amazing movement teachers with us too, Wojtek Cackowski, who’s been on the show. Gunter Bisges, who’s an amazing Feldenkreis teacher, and Bibiana Badenes, a physical therapist from Spain. They were all giving their movement perspective on the advanced myofascial techniques work we were teaching there.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah, awesome.

Til Luchau:

Yeah.

Whitney Lowe:

So we’re really a pretty rich, integrated degree of things that people are doing during the day with learning stuff in the morning and application stuff later in the day as well.

Til Luchau:

Yeah. Being isolated out in the jungle that really let us design a learning environment that was ideal for the pace and for the scenario where we could dive deep, again, after breakfast when people are fresh into the theoretical or some of the more involved movement parts. And then in the afternoons leave it open for application and dialogue and conversations with people. Amazing.

Whitney Lowe:

So I’m curious about this because my mind automatically goes to things like logistics and things like that and how you do certain types of things. So you’re out on a floating thing, do you have electricity for showing things on your PowerPoint screen or whatever-

Til Luchau:

I like how you think. That’s how I think too. So hey, how am I going to teach? Can I teach with of my PowerPoints? Yeah. Well, they actually did fire up the generator they have there for the PowerPoint. A few times a week we’d have a PowerPoint and then in the evening they’d fire it up for some lights in the dining room, things like that. But otherwise it’s silent or jungle sounds going on. All kinds of birds and monkeys and things like that. In fact, just for fun, I’m going to play that one just ’cause I can. Is that okay if I bring a little bit of jungle sound? I’m pretty good at this, but you tell me, does that come through?

Whitney Lowe:

Yes, I hear the jungle now.

Til Luchau:

Yeah.

Whitney Lowe:

So this is live jungle sounds from your teaching…?

Til Luchau:

Yeah, this is recorded right there at the venue. And this is an hour long recording the owner of the place did, and it has monkeys and you can hear elephants trumpeting off in the distance and all kinds of crazy things and stuff.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah.

Til Luchau:

Anyway, enough of that.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah, very interesting. And the animals come down into your little teaching space?

Til Luchau:

It’s hard to compete as a teacher with monkeys swinging between the trees right outside the classroom. When they would go by or climb down the hill there, it was full interruption of the PowerPoint, say.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah.

Til Luchau:

We’d all go watch monkeys for a little bit.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah. The place I was teaching in Costa Rica last year, there was some giant iguanas that are on the sort of pavilion roof that come in, there’s this big opening in the roof, and they look down into the classroom. They’re like watching you and everything. And then every once in a while they jump down out of the trees and everybody’s very distracted looking around there. But it’s definitely a different classroom environment, different classroom disruption than we usually get.

Til Luchau:

Yeah. So you’re all about this tropical retreat teaching. You know about that.

Whitney Lowe:

Well, yeah, it was my first time doing that and it was certainly interesting. Yeah, it was definitely an interesting environment.

Til Luchau:

Well, are you going back there? Do you have plans for more?

Whitney Lowe:

Yes, I am going back again this year in early June, back to the Costa Rica School of Massage for another week long thing.

Til Luchau:

Oh, it’s such an amazing place. That’s great.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah, indeed. So well, tell me about the students that are coming. Well, actually, let’s backtrack for a moment. There was Thailand first and then what was next?

Til Luchau:

Thailand. Well, okay, but I could tell you about the students in Thailand.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah.

Til Luchau:

Because they came from the States, from Canada, from Europe. In the past we’ve had Australians come up. So they were all traveling in from various places and it was a great international mix of students coming together there in Thailand. Then the next stop was actually not yet Taiwan. I actually took a week off and went and did a diving course or a free diving course, rather.

Whitney Lowe:

Oh.

Til Luchau:

And I’m going to resist. I got really excited by it, and I’m going to resist telling too much about it because I’m hoping to get a guest on our show who can tell us about it because it’s so relevant to what we do. Free diving is when you dive without a tank or without any equipment, you do it all in one breath. And the key to being able to do that comfortably and for a long period of time is essentially to engage your parasympathetic nervous system, to slow your heartbeat down and slow your movements and even your cognitive processing down to really calm yourself and then you can stay underwater for a long time.

Whitney Lowe:

Interesting.

Til Luchau:

Yeah, this discipline, they have some very simple, direct, but effective ways to do that, to really feel your parasympathetic system getting engaged. And it was remarkable experience to be floating in the water there and just preparing for a dive and to feel every little ripple of my autonomics. I hear a motor off in the distance. I could just feel my sympathetic system go, “Wait a minute, do I need to look for that?” It’s like a ripple sensation through the body. They have some really interesting things they’re doing. I hope to hear more about that on a future episode.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah. Cool. Yeah. So there was the teaching retreat, the week off, and then Taiwan?

Til Luchau:

Yeah, my diving class. And then Taiwan. Taiwan is a remarkable and unique place. If you know anything about its history, it’s its own island with its own indigenous tribes and then 4 million Chinese escaped mainland China there in the forties with Chiang Kai-shek as they were losing the communist revolution and set up their own republic there, which is in a funny pariah situation in the world because they’re not recognized as a country by a lot of places because China will cut off relationships with you if you do that as a country. But they are a liberal democracy, have been since the eighties. Very highly educated country, very high literacy rates, very high standard of living, super serious about education.

So as a teacher, it’s the delight to teach there, where the learning that they… Well, they were my next to last stop before COVID on my last international trip, before the pandemic hit was in Taiwan. And I was the first teacher this organization had back since the epidemic too. So they were so glad to see me. We’re glad to see each other, and they had taken what I’d given them three years previously so seriously that they were quoting things back to me that, of course I didn’t remember saying, but they came with their stories of their clients and the successes and clarifications they wanted. So it’s just a really amazing teaching experience.

And we had some westerners there too. If you ever want to go to a different culture, an amazing culture, and you want to do some continuing education anyway, come visit in Taiwan, say, or one of these countries, because it’s all taught in English and it would be a remarkable experience to see it happening cross-culturally in that way.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah. Tell me a little bit about what your sense is of the world of body work and manual therapy in Taiwan. Is it mostly based on some of the traditional Asian systems of body work or how…?

Til Luchau:

There is a whole-

Whitney Lowe:

What is it that their people do?

Til Luchau:

Yeah. I’m not an expert on that at all, but from what I gathered, there is a traditional body work world or profession of people going on. There’s quite a number of storefront massage institutions where you just can either book appointment or show up and they’re nicely appointed. There’s a whole variety of different, you could say, probably price points or scales in that.

And then this organization that I was working with is a school that teaches all sorts of different physical therapy disciplines mostly, but they also run three clinics in a department in a hospital where they employ over a hundred therapists. And then they offer continuing education classes for their physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech pathologists. We had a whole mix of different professions. And then they opened it up for open enrollment. So we did have some people with massage background or physical strength and conditioning. So it was a diverse group of backgrounds.

But again, very, very highly educated, very exposed to different modalities that we will learn here in the west because they bring a lot of teachers from the west there. So the practice there, it was great for me, again, to teach to that diverse group and then to hear how they had applied it, say, how they had applied it in the hospital setting and the questions they were having.

Whitney Lowe:

Is there a similar set-up with entry level education versus continuing professional development like we have here in the west? Or how is their educational system set up?

Til Luchau:

I didn’t get a good sense of how that works for massage therapy, but certainly for physical therapy and those other professions I mentioned. Yeah, it’s very similar. You do your university work and internship and then constant continuing education. That’s why I was there, basically to give them some of that.

Whitney Lowe:

And most of your students, for example, the Taiwanese students were mostly pretty proficient in English for what you were doing, or did you have to work with translators?

Til Luchau:

Yeah, well, we had a translator as well, but most were proficient in English. So it’s a great experience teaching in another language because it slows me down and makes me very precise about what I have to say. I can’t just ramble on.

Whitney Lowe:

Right.

Til Luchau:

‘Cause there has to be time to say it in two languages.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah. Interesting. Yeah. What did you find, as an educator, to be some of the biggest challenges of these different environments in terms of either the logistics there or…?

Til Luchau:

Besides competing with monkeys and saying less? Biggest challenges, you said?

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah.

Til Luchau:

Boy, I’m just remembering the good times, honestly. It’s so stimulating to me as a teacher to have to clarify what I’m teaching for these different environments. Whether it’s a retreat format where I have people’s full attention, other than the monkeys competing with me, or in this very urban setting in Taiwan, very dense, very highly populated country. We were right downtown in Taipei, like a mile from Taipei 101, which is the second tallest skyscraper in the world, so it’s like-

Whitney Lowe:

Oh, wow.

Til Luchau:

It’s like New York City or something, this environment that we’re teaching in, but denser, Asian version of that. And so in that situation where people are seeing dozens, if not more clients every week in a hospital setting, again, to focus in on the essential parts of what I’m trying to teach is a great exercise for me as a teacher. And then to see how that lands and see how people use it and to adjust.

And what’s so great about the hands-on work, Whitney, I don’t know if you experienced this too, is people get into it in any particular learning channel, in a way. As long as we’re doing a decent job as teachers, the people that really want to know more about the kinesthetic learning can just focus on what they’re doing with their hands, the people that are the geeks like me and you. We can really get into the technical, anatomical, or biomechanical, or neurological aspects of what we’re doing.

To do that, again in a across culture, especially the non-verbal part. Back to Thailand now, we did a day with the staff at the retreat house who are all Thai or from Myanmar. Refugees had come over and were working there in the retreat center. We did a day where we just worked on them, and many of them don’t speak English. And so it was a great exercise for the therapist there to ascertain what was wanted and how the work was going, and to invite feedback along the way when you don’t have English as the communicator.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah. Yeah. Again, back to Thailand for a second. I’m curious what your sort of perspective is of the impact of that shared residential experience with the students, how that impacts what they’re doing in the learning environment? The fact that they’re with each other all day in their training program, and then they’re often with each other in the afternoons or the evening times as well. How does that impact the learning experience?

Til Luchau:

It’s how I got started, really. I got my entry level education from living for years at the Esalen Institute in California where it was residential. I was on the staff there and there were teachers coming in, working with other students, but also with the staff. And so we got to live with the work and live with each other and practice on the off hours or talk shop at dinner. And that way of learning really stuck with me, made an impression with me so that I, for years, have been looking for ways to essentially recreate that residential experience.

And it’s very different when you can live it, when you can just eliminate all the distractions of having to go back to your email or whatever, or squeezing in other obligations through end of the day. When you can just soak it in and be with it 24/7 for the length of the particular class retreat. It’s great as a teacher, but it’s also great as a student, I think from what I’m hearing.

Whitney Lowe:

Did you find any of your students or notice any of your students having withdrawal, technology withdrawal coming out and doing that?

Til Luchau:

Yeah, there was a bit of that. There was a bit of that, yeah. It wasn’t bad and people were prepared for it, and we actually walk people through it in a way. But no, it’s amazing how quickly you get used to not checking your phone every whatever. And phones were left in the rooms. People could sneak off to their room and get their technology fix if they wanted. But in the public spaces, you were technology free. And that was just… The quality of conversation changed, the quality of the attention and of course in the teaching and things like that just really changed.

Speaking of cultural differences, it’s not unheard of here in the States to see people texting in class. Some teachers have policies about that or ask people not to. Sometimes I’ll do that if there’s a lot of it, but it didn’t even occur to me that that was not happening in Taiwan. Now, back to this urban culture where we are in the midst of very highly developed technological society, people weren’t doing that. People weren’t doing that. There was some note-taking or some picture taking, but there wasn’t a split attention thing that we get.

Whitney Lowe:

And do you think that is about trying to maintain attention in a certain way? Or is it a cultural thing about it’s rude to interrupt the instructor and do that? Or there’s maybe some combination of both.

Til Luchau:

There is a culture of teacher veneration there too. Like just stopping out for the morning coffee at the place on the way to the classroom. Second or third day, the barista asked me, he says, “Hey, where are you from?” I said, “America.” He says, “What are you doing here?” I says, “I’m teaching a class.” His eyes got big. And he says, “Oh, teacher.” And he bows to me. He didn’t know what class I was teaching. He didn’t know what- But there’s that sort of elevation of the profession of teacher within society there that probably comes with a lot of that respect and focus there.

Whitney Lowe:

I would love to live in a world like that. Where that is respected to that degree.

Til Luchau:

Yeah. I know. I know. That’s right.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah. So what’s coming up? Do you have any of these other adventure education experiences on the horizon again this year?

Til Luchau:

Yeah. Thanks for directing me towards that. I could go on showing these mental slides forever. I could just go on talking for a while. But yeah, what’s coming up, we have some fun ones. Let me pull up my list there. There’s one going on right now in Livermore, California with Bruce Nelson where they meet at a wine country resort, Purple Orchid Spa. So this model of being able to be together and focus together is one we’re trying in different ways. In that one, people are in the local area coming in for the day, but there are some people staying right there as well.

The next one that’s like a destination trip is in Puerto Rico. We’ve been going there every year for many years, and our host there, Carmen Rivera at the Puerto Rican Massage and Bodywork Institute’s, amazing organizer and teacher in her own right. And in the past we’ve done like rainforest tours and hung out on beaches and did this haunted old San Juan tour. Like there’s centers of history there in San Juan. And this tour guide we had, who was actually a student in the class too, took us on this amazing tour full of stories of the colonial history of the place.

Whitney Lowe:

Oh, wow.

Til Luchau:

Yeah. So that’s coming up in November, and really invite some Americans as they call us. They’re part of the US, it’s not a separate country, no passport or anything to come down and visit them for that. I might be doing something in Colorado this summer. I’m still trying to work out the details of that. Next year, we have trips to Ireland planned with Aubrey going. Norway. This year is also Portland, Oregon, which is its own cultural experience, if you haven’t been to Portland, just to go do an urban retreat there and be part of that same standpoint.

Whitney Lowe:

Those Oregon people are crazy, though.

Til Luchau:

Right. I already said Portland. I was going to say Portland again.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah.

Til Luchau:

Pennsylvania, et cetera. And the one I’m leading up to is a walking workshop on the Camino de Santiago, which is an ancient pilgrimage route in Spain. And a walking workshop means that we walk for nine days together, and each morning we meet in small groups with one of the faculty, with me or Robert Schleip is one of the faculty. Some of these other faculty members, like Bibiana Badenes, who I mentioned on Thailand is also one of the faculty. You meet in a small group with one of us, and we teach for an hour or so about something related to walking and give you some homework essentially to try during the day as you walk. And then we walk along this path or this route to our next destination where we meet up at the end of the day and debrief and relax and have a great Spanish supper, which goes late into the evening.

Whitney Lowe:

Oh, cool.

Til Luchau:

The next day we do it again. We’re doing a day off in Pamplona, and the food supposedly along this route is spectacular. So it’s just a very pleasurable way to learn and move every day and get to know each other. So that’s also one of the most remarkable things we do. This will be our third time doing that course.

Whitney Lowe:

So what have been your main learning things? Any interesting, fascinating things that you’d say have been great learning experiences for you out of doing all this?

Til Luchau:

Technically, I learn a lot from the teachers that come along because we get a diverse faculty coming here, guest teachers, though I learned a whole lot this last trip about from Wojtek Cackowski about his movement form and the way he’s applying his physical therapy background and structural integration background in movement. I look forward to learning a lot from Robert Schleip on the Camino, just in terms of his breadth of knowledge about fascia and the way it functions, and then also how it connects to the experience level. He’s not just interested in the tissue qualities, but he really does connect it out into the experience of being a body and being a person. So I’m looking forward to that.

But teaching in these different environments, Whitney, I think it’s something about, for me as a teacher, I think it’s something about how we teach from who we are. There’s PowerPoints, there’s curriculum, there’s techniques, there’s outlines. But in the end, when we’re just hanging out together in these different environments, it’s so much about the interaction and the curiosity that we have about each other that ends up being the context for that learning. And so just living in that, practicing that, being in that is probably the most enjoyable part of it all for me.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah. A lot of the discussion about creating ideal learning environments emphasizes this whole idea that learning is a social experience. And there is a certain element of what goes on in the educational institutions whether it’s the traditional schooling that we all go to in our early years, or even in a lot of the later courses that we’re doing in advanced training things. A lot of it is about information delivery and content delivery. But there’s still that whole experiential aspect of the social part of learning, of communicating with your peers and having discussions around lunch and things that spark curiosity and spark integration of the things that you’re being exposed to. And I think that’s irreplaceable in the online environment. That’s where that whole thing about being around people really just excels tremendously for that particular thing for sure.

Til Luchau:

Yeah, that’s so true. I’ve had this working hypothesis for years that the reason body workers and massage therapists do continuing education is so they can have some company once in a while.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah.

Til Luchau:

Because we work in such solitary contexts. We have a client, but we don’t really get that chance to mix with each other in the same way. So that’s one of the functions that continuing education serves is a chance to have that interaction, toss around the ideas, but also just the companionship or the collegiality you get from being around them.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah, there’s something just really crucial about the shared experience of… Even you can make a body worker joke and they’ll get it. Your family and friends may not or something, but yeah, that is an important part of that whole shared learning process, I think. Yeah.

Til Luchau:

That’s true.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah.

Til Luchau:

Thanks for giving me a chance to tell my stories.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah, it was-

Til Luchau:

How about you? You travel. You’re starting to travel some. You mentioned going to Costa Rica in June again.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah, getting back out on the road. I haven’t done many of these residential learning experience things. So I have done a fair amount of traveling stuff to different places where it’s the traditional environment of the long weekend workshop or something like that. So again, that’s why I was asking about unique cultural things, because I think those things are always fascinating to look at. But yeah, I haven’t done-

Til Luchau:

Maybe we’ll have to try to tempt you on one of these trips some days. Maybe it’d be like a bird trip to South America or something.

Whitney Lowe:

I would absolutely love that, yeah.

Til Luchau:

Maybe you pick the place we go. It’ll be a bird trip. What do you think?

Whitney Lowe:

Very cool. Yeah. Yeah. So very cool. So yeah, we’ll do that sometime. That sounds like a good plan. Yeah.

Til Luchau:

Well, should we wrap it up for the day?

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah, that sounds like a good wrapping point for it. And thank you so much for sharing your experiences on the learning journey and giving us some insight into those as well.

Til Luchau:

Yeah, on the way out, I need to thank the staff that makes this all possible here in our organization, but also at these retreat centers where we go to. Rebecca Green, Carlos, Marcel, Jasmine, all working really hard in the background here to make it a seamless experience for people. Rebecca actually got to come along with us to Thailand this time, which was great to have her along.

And then also, I’m just thinking now the question that probably comes up in people’s mind is how do you afford this? How much does this cost? And there’s so much we do to keep it affordable and we have payment plans and things like that. You hold it with a deposit and you pay over time. It’s not a small expense to go to Thailand, say for 10 days, but it’s something around the neighborhood of three grand. We always target that as like 3000 US dollars as the target for these longer retreats that go on over 10 days. It’s not a small expense. That means that it’s something that you can save for and make happen over time. And compared to other professional experiences, it’s right on par if you compare it to like a vacation.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah.

Til Luchau:

It’s actually pretty cheap. A vacation in Hawaii would cost you many times that for the same amount of time.

Whitney Lowe:

Right. All right.

Til Luchau:

Speaking of finances, I should thank our closing sponsor. They help us financially be able to do all this. Books of Discovery has been a part of massage therapy education for over 20 years. Thousands of schools around the world teach with their textbooks, eTextbooks and digital resources. Books of Discovery likes to say, “Learning adventures start here.” They see that same spirit here on The Thinking Practitioner Podcast, and they’re proud to support our work knowing we share their mission to bring the massage and body work community enlivening content that advances our profession.

Whitney Lowe:

And you can check out their collection of eTextbooks and digital learning resources for pathology, kinesiology, anatomy and physiology at booksofdiscovery.com, where thinking practitioner listeners can save 15% by entering THINKING at checkout. So thank you to all of our listeners and all of the sponsors for our shows. You can stop by our sites for the video show notes, transcripts, and any extras. You can find that over on my site at academyofclinicalmassage.com. And Til, where can they find that for you?

Til Luchau:

Advanced-trainings.com. We’ll put all those links we mentioned in the show notes as well, wherever you listen to the podcast.

Whitney Lowe:

Great. And questions, things that you’d like to hear us talk about, things that you want to say to us, send us information, you can always connect with us by email at info@thethinkingpract- Excuse me, [email protected] or look for us on social media under our names. Should I be your name or nah, I guess I’ll still be my name. I’ll be my name on social. Whitney Lowe over there until-

Til Luchau:

Yeah. Whitney Lowe is your name. Til Luchau is my name. People have said, though, they can’t tell us apart and they wish you what we would say our names more, but I think that is a compliment from my side that I get confused with you. Yeah. Email us your suggestions for new retreat destinations. How about that?

Whitney Lowe:

There’s a good one. Yeah.

Til Luchau:

Yeah. Rate us on Apple Podcasts, as it really does help people find the show. And you can hear us on Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, or wherever else you listen and share the word and please tell a friend. Thanks for today, Whitney. Thanks for your interest and great questions about…

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah, enjoyed talking about it. Any of those people who can’t remember who’s who, I’m the guy with the Southern accent.

Til Luchau:

I don’t know what accent I have. Colorado, lets say.

Whitney Lowe:

Yeah. All righty. Sounds good. We’ll see you next. Go round.

Til Luchau:

Okay. See you later.

Whitney Lowe:

Okay.

 

 

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